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Dispute Resolution

When disputes arise, they can often have far-reaching implications for the rest of a business.

Contentious issues need to be dealt with swiftly and appropriately to prevent them escalating, keeping disruption and financial impact to a minimum. Mitigating risk is just as important as robustly fighting a claim in court. There are numerous alternatives to litigation, so pursuing the right strategy is important to ensure disputes are resolved in the most effective way.

Lewis Silkin Dispute Resolution

We treat problems as if they are our own, working closely and collaboratively with our clients to provide practical solutions that fit with their commercial objectives. While we have a substantial group of litigators, we are also experts in alternative dispute resolution, mediation and arbitration. In addition, we also provide risk mitigation and investigation services to help clients identify where issues might arise, and where they have in the past, to work out the causes and implement solutions.

Whether it’s handling high-profile, complex cases in the High Court and beyond, or working behind the scenes with a minimum of fuss, clients rely on our first-class insight to help them stay one step ahead.

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