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Tax, Rewards & Incentives

Navigating this complex and constantly evolving area presents real challenges for many businesses, entrepreneurs and executives alike, but the benefits – financial and otherwise – of getting tax, rewards and incentives right can be substantial.

Whether structuring business sales in a tax efficient manner, implementing sophisticated bonus schemes or equity arrangements for staff, or co-ordinating tax arrangements for cross-border transactions, the possibilities – and potential pitfalls – are many and varied.

We guide our clients through the complexities and technicalities in a clear and down to earth way. Our skills lie in disentangling the issues so that our advice is straightforward and business-friendly, helping you to achieve your commercial aims in a way which minimises risk and maximises efficiency.

Lewis Silkin Tax

Advising individuals and businesses ranging from multinational blue-chip corporates to SMEs, our expertise spans areas as diverse as tax and VAT planning, property transactions, pensions taxation, partnership structures, staff incentives, investment and funding issues, restructurings, and international tax considerations to address any challenge you may face.

Related items

Lewis Silkin advises on sale of leading digital service design agency We Are Friday to PA Consulting

17 December 2018

Leading law firm Lewis Silkin LLP has advised We Are Friday, a leading digital service design and engineering agency, on its acquisition by PA Consulting.

Lewis Silkin appointed to Crown Commercial Service wider public sector legal services panel

06 December 2018

Lewis Silkin is delighted to announce its appointment to the Government’s Crown Commercial Service (CCS) Wider Public Sector Legal Services agreement (RM3788) to provide a full range of legal services to public bodies in the UK.

Freelancer tax: What ad agencies need to know

29 November 2018

The Chancellor, who has dubbed himself ‘Fiscal Phil’, announced in the Budget the latest measure to combat what HMRC calls “false self-employment”. There will be a fundamental reform of who bears the risk of PAYE and NIC under the IR35 rules. However there are concerns that this change will simply make it harder to engage freelancers without a disproportionate compliance cost.

Using contractors? Get ready for the IR35 tax rules - FULLY BOOKED

27 November 2018

The Chancellor announced in the Budget the latest measure to combat what HMRC calls “false self-employment”, aimed at those who supply their services via their own company.

Budget 2018. What a wonderful surprise! No really, you shouldn’t have!

30 October 2018

It was my birthday recently, so I was delighted when the Chancellor told me he had got me a present. A Budget! It was a little late, distinctly homemade, and wrapped in a spreadsheet (natch) - but I was fascinated to find out what was inside. In other words, here is a selection of key tax changes for business that were announced in the Budget.

Private sector needs to operate new IR35 rules for contractors from April 2020

30 October 2018

The Chancellor has confirmed that with effect from 6 April 2020 businesses in the private sector which engage contractors - individuals who supply their services via their own company or partnership (“Intermediary”) - will be responsible for determining whether the IR35 rules apply. If the business considers that IR35 applies, the person paying the Intermediary will be responsible for operating PAYE and NICs on the fees it pays to the Intermediary.

Lewis Silkin French Desk advises long term client Sopra Steria (Euronext Paris) on the acquisition of lending solutions provider Sword Apak

25 October 2018

The Lewis Silkin French Desk has advised its long term client Sopra Steria on its acquisition, through its subsidiary Sopra Banking Software, of lending solutions software provider Sword Apak, a subsidiary of Sword Group.

Matthew Rowbotham comments for Essential Retail: Will an Amazon Tax really save the UK high street?

24 October 2018

In an article for Essential Retail, Matthew Rowbotham comments on the Chancellor of the Exchequer suggestion of bringing in a special tax on online businesses coined the "Amazon Tax" in an attempt to rescue brick and mortar retailers in the UK.

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